Tonga Tonga Events

Pita Taufatofua, the Tongan athlete known for his shirtless demeanour, has secured a spot in Tokyo. When it comes to how the coronavirus will affect the Tokyo Olympics in 2020, I'm jumping at the chance.

Whatever Taufatofua's performance in the water, Saturday's result ensures he will again represent Tonga, a country of about 100,000 people on an archipelago east of Australia. The 36-year-old earned his spot on the podium after finishing third at last year's World Championships in Rio de Janeiro.

On 4 June 1970, the Kingdom of Tonga gained its independence from Great Britain and became a member of the Community of Nations (CoN) and Prince Fatafehi Tu'ipelehak was appointed Prime Minister and King Taufa'ahau Tupou IV became Head of State of the Kingdom. On February 11, 2006, Unuaki otonga Tuku'aho resigned and Dr. Feleti Sevele was appointed interim Prime Minister until February 12, 2006. The mandate of the CJTF - TongA includes assistance in the restoration of law and order and the protection of airports.

On 26 November 2010, the two countries issued a joint statement and Australia and New Zealand sent 14 observers to monitor the parliamentary elections. The CJTF - Tonga is made up of 228 peacekeepers, including the Joint Task Force commander, Lieutenant Colonel Michael O'Neill, who is commanded by the Deputy Chief of Staff, Major Michael D'Alessandro. At the request of the government, a joint working group led by New York, Australia and New Jersey was sent to the country on 14 November 2011 in response to a terrorist attack on the Tongan embassy in the capital, Togo.

On 25 November 2010, parliamentary elections were held and fifty-five candidates competed for nine elected seats in the Legislative Assembly. Pro-democracy reform candidates won five of the nine seats elected, but the DPFI won only one, the seat of Tonga's pro-reform Democratic Party.

King George Tupou V appointed fifteen members of the Legislative Assembly and seven representatives elected by popular vote. King Taufa - ahau - tupou IV appointed twelve members to the Legislative Assembly, seven of whom were elected from hereditary noble families. The 23-member Legislative Assembly comprises nine members of the Tonga Hereditary Assembly, elected in popular elections, and nine representatives, chosen from among the nine members of the Legislative House, the Royal Family.

In 1975, parliamentary elections were held and thirty candidates ran for seven seats in the Legislative Assembly. Independents won seven of the seven seats in the Legislative Assembly, and won all. On 14 April 1978, parliamentary elections were held in which the independents won six out of seven seats and seven out of nine deputies. On 1 May 1981, parliamentary elections were held in which the independents won three of the five seats and nine of the nine representative seats. The parliamentary elections are held on 7 May 1984, the independents win four out of six seats in seat 1, one seat 2, two seats 3, three seats 4, four seats 5, five seats 6 and six seats 7.

The parliamentary elections will take place from 14 to 15 May 1990, with the pro-democratic reform candidates winning four out of seven seats and seven out of nine representative seats. The parliamentary elections were held from 3 to 4 February 1993, and they won three of the five seats in the first, second, third, fifth, sixth and seventh. The parliamentary elections will take place from 24 to 25 January 1996 and the candidate for the pro-democratic reform will win two out of four seats and nine out of nine seats in parliament. The parliamentary elections took place from 13 to 14 May 1997, in which the anti-political parties won one of three elected seats and five of eight representative seats in the legislature.

The parliamentary elections took place from 10 to 11 March 1999 and won two of the three seats in the Parliament and five of the eight representative seats in the Parliament. The parliamentary elections were held on 7 March 2002 and the pro-democratic reform candidate for the first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh seats won one of the four elected seats and seven of the nine representative seats in the parliament. They won three of the five seats in the second and third and four of the seven elected members of parliament, as well as two of the five seats on the third floor of the parliament and a total of six seats in parliament. On 17 March 2005, they held the parliamentary election, and their candidate, the anti-party, won six out of ten seats, three out of twelve seats and one out of four deputies.

On 17 November 2006, the government declared a state of emergency and announced that 21 of the 30 seats in the Legislative Assembly would be filled by democratic elections to be held in 2008. The parliamentary elections were held from 23 to 24 April 2008 and the Human Rights and Democracy Movement (HRDM) won all the seats elected.

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